BC's New Curriculum in Richmond

B.C.'s curriculum has been designed by a team of B.C. educators based on solid research, extensive consultation, and classroom successes from around the world. Teachers in Richmond are implementing the new curriculum in Kindergarten to Grade 9 this year.

Personalized learning is at the heart of the new curriculum and students will have hands-on experience applying the skills that they will need to succeed in college, university, and the workforce.

This website will be used to share information and provide our community with opportunities for feedback.

To be informed about new updates please register.


B.C.'s curriculum has been designed by a team of B.C. educators based on solid research, extensive consultation, and classroom successes from around the world. Teachers in Richmond are implementing the new curriculum in Kindergarten to Grade 9 this year.

Personalized learning is at the heart of the new curriculum and students will have hands-on experience applying the skills that they will need to succeed in college, university, and the workforce.

This website will be used to share information and provide our community with opportunities for feedback.

To be informed about new updates please register.


  • Demystifying French Immersion

    5 months ago

    Early French Immersion provides students an opportunity to learn a second (and, sometimes third or fourth) language in a fun and effective way. While many parents continue to apply for French Immersion in our school district, the applications can sometimes be accompanied by some hesitations around second language learning. Perhaps the research provided below will continue to help demystify the myths surrounding French Immersion.

    Myth 1: Learners need to have a strong foundation in their first language (eg. They know how to read and write) before they learn another language.

    What the research says: There are many individuals...

    Early French Immersion provides students an opportunity to learn a second (and, sometimes third or fourth) language in a fun and effective way. While many parents continue to apply for French Immersion in our school district, the applications can sometimes be accompanied by some hesitations around second language learning. Perhaps the research provided below will continue to help demystify the myths surrounding French Immersion.

    Myth 1: Learners need to have a strong foundation in their first language (eg. They know how to read and write) before they learn another language.

    What the research says: There are many individuals who develop two languages from birth. When thinking about when students should start studying a second language after learning their first language, the research has shown that the starting point makes no long-term difference in their oral or writing skills (Arnett & Bourgoin, 2018, p. 24)

    Myth 2: Learning another language will have negative long-term effects on the first language skills of the learner.

    What the research says: There is often a short-term decline in first language skills of language learners compared to monolingual students, but in the long term, no negative effects have been observed. Generally, students who are proficient in multiple languages have stronger overall skills than monolingual students (Arnett & Bourgoin, 2018, p. 24).

    The research provided above and more information can be found in the following resource: Access for Success: Making Inclusion Work for Language Learners by Katy Arnett and Renée Bourgoin.


  • Inquiry-Based Science and the Redesigned Curriculum

    5 months ago
    Picture1

    BC’s Redesigned Curriculum places renewed emphasis on inquiry-based science education. This approach to teaching science is not new, having been first endorsed by John Dewey over 100 years ago, however, it is now a foundational component of science programs across Canada and the world. There are three reasons commonly cited for moving to a more inquiry-based model of science education: to increase student engagement; to improve science literacy among students; and to engage students in the practices of professional scientists. By engaging in an inquiry process, students act as scientists as they form questions, design investigations, analyze and evaluate...

    BC’s Redesigned Curriculum places renewed emphasis on inquiry-based science education. This approach to teaching science is not new, having been first endorsed by John Dewey over 100 years ago, however, it is now a foundational component of science programs across Canada and the world. There are three reasons commonly cited for moving to a more inquiry-based model of science education: to increase student engagement; to improve science literacy among students; and to engage students in the practices of professional scientists. By engaging in an inquiry process, students act as scientists as they form questions, design investigations, analyze and evaluate results, and communicate evidence and findings. These science skills and habits of mind are reflected in the prescribed Curricular Competencies that run through the Science Curriculum from K-12.

    At the Richmond School District, we acknowledge a continuum of levels of inquiry, ranging from confirmation (in which students confirm already known results) to open (in which students ask their own questions and design their own investigations). Providing more opportunities for open inquiry allows for a greater shift from student as receiver of knowledge to student as co-constructor of knowledge. Inquiry-based practices increase scientific literacy, equipping students with the ability to make informed decisions in their lives and the skills necessary to participate in the 21st century economy. To find out more about the Redesigned Science Curriculum click on this link: https://curriculum.gov.bc.ca/curriculum/science/introduction


  • English Language Learners

    7 months ago
    62308

    In Richmond, we support over 5000 students in their language acquisition of English. Many of students are born here in Canada or come to us from other parts of the country or world. Regardless of where our students are from, our ELL and classroom teachers, administrators and support staff work hard to help all students feel safe and included. ELL is a support rather than a “program” to be passed or finished. Our goal is to provide additional support to students so that they can eventually access the B.C. Curriculum academically and independently. Our Provincial government provides schools with limited...

    In Richmond, we support over 5000 students in their language acquisition of English. Many of students are born here in Canada or come to us from other parts of the country or world. Regardless of where our students are from, our ELL and classroom teachers, administrators and support staff work hard to help all students feel safe and included. ELL is a support rather than a “program” to be passed or finished. Our goal is to provide additional support to students so that they can eventually access the B.C. Curriculum academically and independently. Our Provincial government provides schools with limited funding for five years; however, much research has proven that it typically takes 5-7 years for a student who is immersed in English to become academically proficient in English. Our ELL teachers provide support in a variety of ways. In-classroom support, pull-out targeted instruction, small group support and collaborative planning and teaching are just a few possibilities. Teachers work together and assess students’ needs on an ongoing basis and adjust the type of support a student may need throughout the year.

    Ministry Policy and Guidelines for ELL:

    https://www2.gov.bc.ca/assets/gov/education/administration/kindergarten-to-grade-12/english-language-learners/guidelines.pdf

  • Ready Set Learn

    9 months ago
    Sd38 rsl

    Richmond School District's Ready Set Learn events are a great way to spend time with your preschooler and see our Richmond schools, meet some of our staff and connect with community partners. All together, 12 events will be held for children under 5 and their families. These events are held at various elementary schools in Richmond on Wednesday mornings from 9:30-11:00 and in the afternoon from 1:00-2:30. The focus for Ready Set Learn is to have fun while developing literacy skills. We have been using First Nations puppets, puzzles, and stories at our events and found this to be very...

    Richmond School District's Ready Set Learn events are a great way to spend time with your preschooler and see our Richmond schools, meet some of our staff and connect with community partners. All together, 12 events will be held for children under 5 and their families. These events are held at various elementary schools in Richmond on Wednesday mornings from 9:30-11:00 and in the afternoon from 1:00-2:30. The focus for Ready Set Learn is to have fun while developing literacy skills. We have been using First Nations puppets, puzzles, and stories at our events and found this to be very engaging. In addition there is play dough, sensory materials, arts and crafts and small blocks. Our local children's entertainer, Will Stroet, performs a lively 30-minute concert for the families with one or two songs performed in French! Ready Set Learn events are our School District's way of sharing information on how young children learn. Our StrongStart educators and Early Learning Teacher Consultant are there to answer questions and to welcome you! Every year more and more families come out and enjoy these events. We look forward to seeing you and your children.

    https://www2.gov.bc.ca/gov/content/education-training/early-learning/support/ready-set-learn




  • Social Emotional Learning

    12 months ago
    Sel
    “Educating the mind without the heart is no education at all.” Aristotle

    What is Social Emotional Learning?

    We know that happy, thoughtful, calm children learn well and are healthier.
    Social and Emotional Learning (SEL) is the process through which our students acquire and effectively apply the knowledge, attitudes, and skills necessary to support them as they grow into healthy, self-aware, and contributing adults. These assets include being able to:
    • understand and manage emotions;
    • set, persevere towards, and achieve appropriate goals;
    • demonstrate empathy for others;
    • establish and maintain positive relationships; and
    • make effective decisions.
    Why is Social Emotional Learning so important?

    “Educating the mind without the heart is no education at all.” Aristotle

    What is Social Emotional Learning?

    We know that happy, thoughtful, calm children learn well and are healthier.
    Social and Emotional Learning (SEL) is the process through which our students acquire and effectively apply the knowledge, attitudes, and skills necessary to support them as they grow into healthy, self-aware, and contributing adults. These assets include being able to:
    • understand and manage emotions;
    • set, persevere towards, and achieve appropriate goals;
    • demonstrate empathy for others;
    • establish and maintain positive relationships; and
    • make effective decisions.
    Why is Social Emotional Learning so important?

    We live in a complicated and busy world. In order to manage that complexity and live vibrant and rewarding lives, we need to be aware of, understand and manage all of the information we receive, the emotions we experience, and relationships we encounter. We know that social and emotional skills are malleable, especially in children and adolescents, and that they are “sticky”, meaning that, once taught and practiced, they become a useful set of skills that can be relied on, long into adulthood.

    How to enhance Social Emotional Learning?

    Social and Emotional Learning includes a number of competencies: self-awareness, self-management, social awareness, relationship skills and responsible decision-making. There are many ways to incorporate SEL into instruction.

  • Career Education

    12 months ago
    Careered

    When people hear the term “Career Education”, many think, “I’m going to learn about what I want to be when I grow up”. While that may be a component, the larger aim is for students to become aware of their personal attributes, skills, interests and areas for growth, in the context of family, school and the community. Through a variety of experiences, this curriculum provides opportunities for students to explore in greater depth their passions and to begin to establish pathways toward their goals. In an ever-changing world, many of the jobs our children will have, do not yet exist....

    When people hear the term “Career Education”, many think, “I’m going to learn about what I want to be when I grow up”. While that may be a component, the larger aim is for students to become aware of their personal attributes, skills, interests and areas for growth, in the context of family, school and the community. Through a variety of experiences, this curriculum provides opportunities for students to explore in greater depth their passions and to begin to establish pathways toward their goals. In an ever-changing world, many of the jobs our children will have, do not yet exist. That is why it is critical to support them in recognizing and developing skills that transfer to other fields. Through awareness, exploration and a variety of experiences, students will learn flexibility, resiliency, and discover areas that motivate and inspire them to transition toward their own individualized career pathway. Explore the BC Career Education curriculum at: https://curriculum.gov.bc.ca/curriculum/career-education/introduction#

    Parents may view several career education resources on the SD38 Career Programs website: http://careerprograms.sd38.bc.ca/parents
  • Let’s Talk – Core Competencies

    about 1 year ago
    Corecomp 2017b

    Self-Assessment of the Core Competencies

    The core competencies are the intellectual, personal, and social skills that all students need to develop in order to engage in deep and life-long learning. B.C. has identified three core competencies as essential for all learners:

    · Communication

    · Thinking

    · Personal and social competency

    The Core competencies are directly related to students becoming educated citizens.

    Throughout the year, each student will have on-going opportunities to self-reflect on the core competencies so that they may identify strengths, stretches and steps for further growth. Parents are encouraged to have conversations with their children about their Communication,...

    Self-Assessment of the Core Competencies

    The core competencies are the intellectual, personal, and social skills that all students need to develop in order to engage in deep and life-long learning. B.C. has identified three core competencies as essential for all learners:

    · Communication

    · Thinking

    · Personal and social competency

    The Core competencies are directly related to students becoming educated citizens.

    Throughout the year, each student will have on-going opportunities to self-reflect on the core competencies so that they may identify strengths, stretches and steps for further growth. Parents are encouraged to have conversations with their children about their Communication, Thinking, and Personal and Social growth. At the end of the year, the Core Competencies will be included on the final report card.

    For more information, please go to the Ministry of Education website: https://curriculum.gov.bc.ca/competencies



  • Numeracy and Learning in Our Schools

    over 1 year ago
    Doingmath

    Numeracy and literacy are the two pillars of BC’s redesigned curriculum. Numeracy can be defined as the use and application of mathematics across a variety of contexts. Developing numerate citizens is a goal of our education system.

    Our K-12 mathematics curriculum focuses on key content strands such as number concepts and operations, patterning and algebra, geometry and measurement, and data analysis and probability. Our redesigned curriculum has a focus on computational fluency and financial literacy is a new area of curricular content. A very significant part of the curriculum is the mathematical curricular competencies such as reasoning, problem-solving,...

    Numeracy and literacy are the two pillars of BC’s redesigned curriculum. Numeracy can be defined as the use and application of mathematics across a variety of contexts. Developing numerate citizens is a goal of our education system.

    Our K-12 mathematics curriculum focuses on key content strands such as number concepts and operations, patterning and algebra, geometry and measurement, and data analysis and probability. Our redesigned curriculum has a focus on computational fluency and financial literacy is a new area of curricular content. A very significant part of the curriculum is the mathematical curricular competencies such as reasoning, problem-solving, communicating and representing.

    In our schools, mathematical learning experiences may involve hands-on problem-solving or investigations, games to practice skills and concepts, number talks, and mathematical thinking routines. Numeracy experiences, where students use and apply their mathematical understanding, happen across curriculum areas such as when measuring and graphing a plant’s growth during science experiences or analyzing data and graphs around issues studied in Social Studies.

    For more information, please visit the Ministry of Education website:

    https://curriculum.gov.bc.ca/curriculum/mathematics/introduction

    Janice Novakowski

    SD38 Teacher Consultant (K-12 Mathematics)


  • Literacy and Learning in our Schools

    over 1 year ago
    Girlread

    Literacy is one of the pillars of BC’s re-designed curriculum. It is central for success while at school and beyond the K-12 school years.

    Literacy encompasses reading, listening, viewing (Comprehend and Connect) and writing, speaking and representing (Create and Communicate). To be literate is the ability to make meaning using a variety of forms of communication.

    In school, students will use literacy skills across a variety of subject areas to share ideas, make meaning and show their learning in different ways. The curriculum uses a variety of materials to learn about who we are, where we live and that there...

    Literacy is one of the pillars of BC’s re-designed curriculum. It is central for success while at school and beyond the K-12 school years.

    Literacy encompasses reading, listening, viewing (Comprehend and Connect) and writing, speaking and representing (Create and Communicate). To be literate is the ability to make meaning using a variety of forms of communication.

    In school, students will use literacy skills across a variety of subject areas to share ideas, make meaning and show their learning in different ways. The curriculum uses a variety of materials to learn about who we are, where we live and that there are multiple perspectives in the world. Students will also use their literacy skills to read and view a range of materials such as stories, film, informational texts, dramas, maps and visual images to learn and understand diverse perspectives ranging from Canadian content to international content. The aim is for students to experience the joy of reading while being able to use their literacy skills as an important thinking and communication tool.

    For more information, please visit the Ministry of Education Website

    https://curriculum.gov.bc.ca

    Lisa Schwartz & Rosalind Poon


  • What are Enhancement Agreements and how do they help Students?

    over 1 year ago
    Logosm

    An EA is a commitment made by each school district, involving all local Aboriginal communities and the Ministry of Education, to work together to improve the success of all Aboriginal students. Richmond signed its second AEAA in February. The agreements are based on mutual respect and trust and represent a five-year vision of success for First Nations, Métis and Inuit students in each school district. Agreements are developed locally by each school district and its Aboriginal communities. The goals focus on student success, and agreements are designed to highlight the importance of academic performance as well as other areas of...

    An EA is a commitment made by each school district, involving all local Aboriginal communities and the Ministry of Education, to work together to improve the success of all Aboriginal students. Richmond signed its second AEAA in February. The agreements are based on mutual respect and trust and represent a five-year vision of success for First Nations, Métis and Inuit students in each school district. Agreements are developed locally by each school district and its Aboriginal communities. The goals focus on student success, and agreements are designed to highlight the importance of academic performance as well as other areas of success important to Aboriginal communities. They also increase knowledge of Aboriginal peoples among students and staff. Enhancement agreements establish programs and services that reflect the culture of local Aboriginal people and increase knowledge and respect for that culture among all students and staff. Agreements emphasize how important traditions, culture, language and history are to Aboriginal student development and success.

    For more information check out: Aboriginal Education Enhancement Agreements